clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Touring Downtown Hollywood's Public Mural Collection


A stroll through downtown Hollyweird is reminiscent of an outdoor arts safari. The funky mid-size city is home to eleven murals painted by prominent South Florida street artists, making this the largest collection of street art outside of Wynwood. The project took hold nearly a year and half ago and is helmed by the Community Redevelopment Agency of Hollywood as an effort to bring cultist lure.

To take it all in, it's best to experience the works by foot. To start, hit up the block of 19th Avenue and Harrison Street just west of ArtsPark at Young Circle. On this southeastern block features Luis Pinto's 45 x 15-foot wall "Amduat," which signifies the afterworld in ancient Egypt. The massive design consists of grey, black and white rectangles that take on the form of a snake set to a pale pink background surrounded by birds.

Head west across the street and check out Miamian art darling Jessy Nite's wall, in which the façade is juxtaposed with a cluster of diamonds and black and white stripes. The kaleidoscope-esque wall measures 18 x 22-foot and sharply coats the building's corner, creating a striking and linear feel.

From there, continue west on Harrison Street to check out post-graffism artist Ruben Ubiera's vivid rendition on the Downtown Hollywood Ramada. In bright colors, he portrayed various characters jamming out to music layered with angular shapes in the background, eliciting a feeling of loudness and movement.

Continue west and look to the south side on your left to find Hollywood's Rob Robi's dreamy abstract and fantastical world, "The Concrete Daydream." This wall is perhaps the subtlest of the collection. It contains floating balls, a pale grey tree, and two realistic figures, one of a child and one of a fairy in a long gown.

Down an entire block, just before the railroad tracks on 21st Avenue lies Miamian Tati Suarez's doe-eyed mermaids. Suarez the most renowned artists of the bunch—she's got international cred on the new contemporary scene—imagined a sexy portrayal of these smoldering sea creatures in a traditional South Beach color scheme.

And the list continues with walls by 2Alas, Miami artist duo Andrew Antonaccio and Orlando Galvez, Girls' Club cofounder Michelle Weinberg, buddies Eddie Mendieta and Jay Bellicci, Broward's Evoca1, David "LEBO" Le Batard, (whose wall drew criticism from city pols) and Atlanta-based Molly Rose Freeman joins as the sole non local artist.

The Downtown Hollywood Mural Project is set to expand within the coming months. The city commission accepted the CRA's request to triple the site, spanning it to Federal and Dixie Highways. No word yet on which artists will join the mural district.—Andrea Richard